Eassay of to kill and elaphant

This creates a wall between him and the people he so kindly believes In.

Eassay of to kill and elaphant

In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people--the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter.

No one had the guts to raise a riot, but if a European woman went through the bazaars alone somebody would probably spit betel juice over her dress. As a police officer I was an obvious target and was baited whenever it seemed safe to do so. When a nimble Burman tripped me up on the football field and the referee another Burman looked the other way, the crowd yelled with hideous laughter.

Eassay of to kill and elaphant

This happened more than once. In the end the sneering yellow faces of young men that met me everywhere, the insults hooted after me when I was at a safe distance, got badly on my nerves. The young Buddhist priests were the worst of all.

There were several thousands of them in the town and none of them seemed to have anything to do except stand on street corners and jeer at Europeans.

Shooting an Elephant Summary - urbanagricultureinitiative.com

All this was perplexing and upsetting. For at that time I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing and the sooner I chucked up my job and got out of it the better.

Theoretically--and secretly, of course--I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British. As for the job I was doing, I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make clear.

In a job like that you see the dirty work of Empire at close quarters. The wretched prisoners huddling in the stinking cages of the lock-ups, the grey, cowed faces of the long-term convicts, the scarred buttocks of the men who had been Bogged with bamboos--all these oppressed me with an intolerable sense of guilt.

But I could get nothing into perspective. I was young and ill-educated and I had had to think out my problems in the utter silence that is imposed on every Englishman in the East.

I did not even know that the British Empire is dying, still less did I know that it is a great deal better than the younger empires that are going to supplant it. All I knew was that I was stuck between my hatred of the empire I served and my rage against the evil-spirited little beasts who tried to make my job impossible.

Feelings like these are the normal by-products of imperialism; ask any Anglo-Indian official, if you can catch him off duty. One day something happened which in a roundabout way was enlightening.

It was a tiny incident in itself, but it gave me a better glimpse than I had had before of the real nature of imperialism--the real motives for which despotic governments act. Early one morning the sub-inspector at a police station the other end of the town rang me up on the phone and said that an elephant was ravaging the bazaar.

Would I please come and do something about it? I did not know what I could do, but I wanted to see what was happening and I got on to a pony and started out. I took my rifle, an old. It was not, of course, a wild elephant, but a tame one which had gone "must. The Burmese population had no weapons and were quite helpless against it.

The Burmese sub-inspector and some Indian constables were waiting for me in the quarter where the elephant had been seen. It was a very poor quarter, a labyrinth of squalid bamboo huts, thatched with palmleaf, winding all over a steep hillside. I remember that it was a cloudy, stuffy morning at the beginning of the rains.

We began questioning the people as to where the elephant had gone and, as usual, failed to get any definite information.

Essay on Elephant for Students in English

That is invariably the case in the East; a story always sounds clear enough at a distance, but the nearer you get to the scene of events the vaguer it becomes.

Some of the people said that the elephant had gone in one direction, some said that he had gone in another, some professed not even to have heard of any elephant.The essay "Shooting an Elephant" is set in a town in southern Burma during the colonial period. The country that is today Burma (Myanmar) was, during the time of Orwell's experiences in the colony, a province of India, itself a British colony.

Eassay of to kill and elaphant

Prior to British intervention in the nineteenth century Burma was a sovereign kingdom. Eassay of “To kill and elaphant” Cheap custom papers from a reliable custom writing company ; Lord of the Flies ; Eros & Psyche and Beauty & the Beast ; My Story of Ganesh ; Exhilarating custom term papers ; send me this sample.

send me this sample. Leave your email and we . Orwell’s essay, however, is more than one person’s riveting narrative about the beginning of an awareness. “Shooting an Elephant” captures a universal experience of going against one’s own humanity at the cost of a part of that humanity.

The elephant is a symbol of Burma and its struggle to prosper under Britain’s control. The fact that the elephant still lives after the third shot is a metaphor of how the Burmese people are still fighting and still have hope after the three wars with Britain.

Orwell also uses connotations and denotations in the essay. Shooting an Elephant Essay. In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people--the (Somehow it always seems worse to kill a LARGE animal.) Besides, there was the beast's owner to be considered.

Alive, the elephant was worth at least a hundred pounds; dead, he would. In Orwell's essay "Shooting an Elephant," an elephant in "must" escapes from its owner and terrorizes the streets of the town in Lower Burma.

When the narrator receives the news that an elephant is.

Eassay of "To kill and elaphant" - Research Paper Example : urbanagricultureinitiative.com